Jalisa Roberts

artivist | choreographer | educator using dance as a language and a means to process the world, spark conversation, and build community.

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”



This invisibility is political.

Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader” (via thinkspeakstress)

And so they say, ‘where are our resource centres,’ ‘why are are there no men’s rights activists’, ‘oh dear that gay agenda’.

But darling everything is already for you. You don’t see your name on it because your grandfathers put a stamp on it centuries ago. 

(via franticcurls)

THIS.